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We make vacuum forming and thermoforming

What is Thermoforming ?

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Thermoforming 

Primer on What is Thermoforming by SPE

Vacuum VS Pressure Forming

Vacuum Forming: A sheet of plastic material is heated to pliability, then pressed against a 3D mold by vacuuming out the air between the sheet, and the mold.

Pros: Cost-Effective, Quicker Tooling, Ability to Form Very Large Parts

Perfect For: Sharper Details, Allows for Undercuts, Tighter Tolerances, Allows for Molded-In Texture

Applications: Point-of-Purchase Displays, Automotive Aftermarket - Interior or Exterior, Recreational Vehicles, Pool and Spa, Equipment Enclosures, Bezels, Housings and Covers, Dunnage Material Handling Trays & Pallets, Fitness Equipment


Pressure Forming: A sheet of plastic material is heated to pliability, then pressed a against a 3D mold by vacuuming out the air between the sheet and the mold, and applying air pressure above the plastic sheet.

Pros: Cost-Effective, Quicker Tooling, Ability to Form Very Large Parts

Perfect For: Complex Shapes, Pieces with Vents or Louvers, Projects with Tighter Tolerances

Applications: Medical Equipment, Office Equipment, Vented Equipment Enclosures, Control Pads, Scientific Instruments, Detailed Components, Control Panels, Multi-Part Assemblies

Thermoforming VS Injection Moulding

 
 

Thermoforming: A flat sheet is heated to a pliable temperature then molded to the tools shape using either suction using vacuum or application of pressure.

  • Tooling: A Single 3D Form is created out of Aluminium 
  • Materials: Flat Thick or Thin Sheets of Thermoplastics
  • Costs: Tooling Costs are low but per part cost is higher than injection moulding
 
 

Injection Moulding: The plastic pallets are heated then injected into the mould. 

  • Tooling: A double sided 3D mould is created out of steel, aluminium or beryllium-copper alloy. 
  • Materials: Thermoplastic pallets
  • Costs: Tooling Costs are high but per part cost is lower

Thermoforming VS FRP

Plastic thermoforming and fiberglass molding can be used to make similar parts, but there are distinct advantages and disadvantages that should be taken into account when choosing the process that is right for a specific plastic component. The information on this page provides some general guidance on how to choose between fiberglass and thermoforming. Plastic thermoforming is a plastic production process that heats a two dimensional rigid thermoplastic sheet and uses vacuum and/or pressure to form that sheet into a three dimensional shape. Thermoforming is typically used for production quantities of 250 to 3000 annually, offering lower tooling costs, rapid product development cycles, and parts with color and texture. Fiberglass molding is a process in which fiberglass reinforced resin is formed into useful shapes. The resin is applied in multiple layers to increase strength and to attain desired thickness. This process and material is best suited to making large structures requiring high strengths, however it carries high tooling cost and slower production rates.

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